Browsing articles tagged with "Rose Lawless Archives - I Love Saturday"
Jun 16, 2016

Joyce & Rebellion – Dublin on Bloomsday

ReadingIt was a day of threatening rain, that didn’t quite bucket down as expected. But the gloomy clouds above did nothing to dampen the city spirit below. Wandering around were all sorts of wonderful characters. Bowler hatted gents, straw boatered chaps, flapper girls, meringue hatted ladies and modern day Molly Blooms. I’ve been mingling with these types around Town all week, but today we joined in the fun!

Bloomsday Festival guide in hand, our first stop was St Andrews on Westland Row. My church. A holy place neither breath taking nor dull, but imposing if only on the inside. Most folk scurry past this impressive building every day on their journey home via Pearse Street Station. St Andrews is not an intimate church, so its size lent itself perfectly to the concert Joyce & Rebellion: A Musical Journey.

St Andrews is one of the many Dublin landmarks immortalised in Joyce’s Ulysses. The programme evoked times gone by with a beautiful mix of song, music, poetry and story. And of course history. St Andrews’ association with the 1916 Rising is celebrated by an exhibition at the church, well worth a visit. Joyce & Rebellion: A Musical Journey reminded us of the heart and courage of local men and women.

Hosted by Elizabeth Watson and Jean Monahan, the pews were filled by plenty of well dressed Joyce enthusiasts. None under 40… Opened with a reading of Thomas Moore’s The Minstrel Boy, by Carmel Heapes, then Moore again, Silent O’Moyle, read by Connie Murray, both accompanied by Carole O’Connor at the ivories. Oro Se Do Bheatha Bhaile was performed by Greenore Community Choir.

JoyceIt really took me back to a time (the 1980s!) with my Granny and Grandad O’Shea. Being in their tiny kitchen singing old songs. The fire blazing, the wireless humming in the background. A big pot of stew brewing on the stove. Tea for the adults, lemonade for us. Grandad with the toasting fork (hot buttered toast…) in one hand and a billowing Woodbine in the other. Granny standing, stirring, chatting.

Down by the Glenside sung by Jean Monahan, followed by George Smith and Simon Heapes’ performance of The Rising of the Moon and The Wearing of the Green. Catherine Byrne read W.B. Yeats September 1913. More memories! School, this time. Too young we were to appreciate anything at all… Of course I remember these poetic rhymes, learned by heart, but how they really speak to me now.

Simon Heapes took to the stage (or altar) once again with Love’s Old Sweet Song. We helped him, nowhere near his tenor, but enjoying it all the same. He was joined by George Smith, belting out A Nation Once Again, with all of us on hand once again. Catherine Byrne brought us more Yeats with The Song of Wandering Aengus. Historical tales of our 1916 heroes knitted together the songs and prose.

George Smith sang Grace, Carmel Heapes read Pearse’s The Mother and Connie Moore sang The Last Rose of Summer. It truly was an escape from the commercial, digital world we live in today. In fact, my iPhone had run out of juice, I didn’t even have to worry about capturing shots. Just being free of technological distraction for a few hours… It’s so relaxing! How art did thrive before Twitter tyranny.

AltarTo My Daughter Betty by Thomas Kettle was told heartfelt by Carmel Heapes, Oft in the Stilly Night performed by Simon Heapes. The final curtain at St Andrews; all three, Simon Heapes, George Smith and Connie Murray with Carole O’Connor on piano, as throughout, in a roof-raising rendition of The Holy City. We were invited up to encore, us fellow Joyceans, and linked arms with Love’s Old Sweet Song.

The concert was free. It was absolutely excellent. Thanks to the St. Andrews Church Choir and St. Andrews Church Heritage Working Group. And, of course, the hugely talented performers. Nobody my age really goes inside a church these days, unless for a wedding, christening, communion or funeral. Not a regular Mass goer, I pop in for solace from the city. And music. And exhibitions. And fun!

Back out into the light of day, dark as it was, we sailed past Kennedy’s, spying the Bloomsday brethren within. We popped in last time, for a wicked performance by the bold Rose Lawless, doing Molly Bloom to only the flawed perfection she can. This time we were in want of tea, not ale, (’twas only midday!) so we tucked ourselves in at cosy café Tri Via, on Lincoln’s Place. A great people watching spot.

Indeed, as we put away delicious homemade muffins, brownies and croissants, did we see a certain Senator, dressed to the nines cane and all, approach Sweny’s next door. David Norris is a familiar face to all Bloomsday patrons and a huge supporter of the Irish arts. Cameras clicked as he swept in and out of another fabled Ullyses stop. Sweny’s Pharmacy is now an olde worlde bookshop and Joyce museum.

Tri ViaIn we went, events sure to unfold. There was a stall outside doing lemonade and madeleines and plenty of vintage fillies and gents milling about. And the scent of lemon soap filled the air. But an impromptu reading from the Dubliners meant we were in luck with perfect timing. A Scottish man, whose name I do not know, gave a swaggering version of a chapter’s events. It was really very, very cool.

A bar of brown paper wrapped lemon soap in the bag we made our way up into Temple Bar, my neighbourhood. This culture vulture lark is hard work, so we broke off to the Porterhouse for a bit of footie action. England v Wales. It’s a top spot for pub grub. We polished off Scampi, Piri Piri Chicken Sandwich and Mixed Veggies all with lovely fluffy chips and a pint each. Oyster Stout for me. Very nice!

Meeting House Square was next on the agenda, for Bloomsday Readings with Keelin Shanley. The journalist and broadcaster was joined by various Irish actors, writers and musicians for another gratis gig. I’ve been known to listen from my bedroom, which looks onto Meeting House Square, in the past. I can catch bands at the Olympia from here too! The square was filled with Joyceans, old and young.

Roisin Ingle, of the Irish Times, was on the stage as we approached. There were hearty performances from Colm O’Gorman, Domini Kemp and, you guessed it, Senator David Norris. We segwayed into the National Photographic Archive to mix up our rebels with our rascals once again. The exhibition, Rising, is free entry (can you see a theme here?) and documents the events in and around the day.

Davy ByrnesBlack and white images of the destruction done to Dublin, the bravery of young Irish men and the effect on the everyday lives of locals are just fascinating. It’s hard to believe it was only 100 years ago… A walking tour of the exhibition is available, but we were happy to take it all in ourselves. I’ll be back with Himself, who’s a big history buff. And we do live next door! Mama and Papa certainly enjoyed it, too.

We were done by now. Off they went, Mother and Father, to Grafton Street, and up to Davy Byrne’s for one last nod to James Joyce. Bloomday is fast becoming one of the city’s most celebrated events, with Bloomsday Festival running events throughout the week. It’s great craic and I always find Townie friends out and about. Next year, Madre and me have promised to dress up! Or don a hat at least…

www.bloomsdayfestival.ie

May 23, 2013

Social-Life Dublin – Pleased to Meet You!

Dublin’s a little town with a lot of people. Getting out and about is easy, so why not meet more of your neighbours? Social-Life Dublin is the city’s newest meet-up. It’s a monthly gathering offering various talks and performances, followed by music and chat. Your Girl Friday, ever the social butterfly, found it fun and informative. Good times! The latest event was a top evening at Boteco Brazil on Ormond Quay.

Caipirinha in hand, I made my way to the cellar bar where plenty of folk were already chattering away. First up was Miller Anthony and his talk “How Enthusiasm Saved My Life!”. Certainly an upbeat topic, life coach Miller talked us through how to channel one’s thought process in a positive direction. Miller explained how enthusiasm in everyday life is the key to happiness. It’s all about mental attitude!

We paused for deliciously authentic Brazilian tapas. Melty mozzarella balls & hot veggie skewers… Nomsters! The stage was set for the inimitable Rose Lawless – cabaret artiste & enfant terrible. The eternally glamorous Rose was her usual mixture of mirth and mischief, regaling us with song and story. She graced us with her comedy numbers including “Up Da Pole” and “Man With a Moustache”.

Social-Life Dublin is run by local bon viveur Jerry O’Brien, whose aim is to showcase a host of interests under the one roof. The idea is to bring positive people together to discuss and take part in hobbies and personal development. The events include talks, entertainment, hobbies, activities, networking and clubbing. Not only is it a great way to meet new friends, but a good opportunity to make connections.

I’ve caught Conor Lynch from Social Media talking personal branding, world traveler Chris Riggs on African safari and Mo Levy on improv comedy, among others. Social-Life Dublin’s next meet-up is Friday June 14th at Boteco Brazil. The line-up includes comedian Marcus O’Laoire, memory master Kevin Redmond and Patricia Tiernan of LEAP Coaching on “How to Find a Job You Love”. See y’all there!

www.facebook.com/Sociallifedublin / Boteca Brazil, 6 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Dec 11, 2012

An Afternoon With Rose Lawless

“It’s like a Recession party” mused the inimitable Rose Lawless. Our favourite cabaret girl was describing Dublin’s creative renaissance. It’s something she’s grasped with relish as her personality, though influenced by Paris and Prague, was born of this great city. Living as she is these days in Georgian Parnell Square, Rose is delighted to find such grand quarters teeming with fellow artists.

“Moore Street is the Montmartre of Dublin” Rose declared “The spirit, the characters, the comedy. It’s all there”. Since the untimely demise of the sorry Tiger, this town is thriving. Dublin has shifted into another gear. The right one, says Rose. “People like us are allowed to go to the party now. The hurt and anger is over and we’re developing a new relationship with ourselves” she paused “It really is la dolce vita”.

We met in the seaside haven of Monkstown and Rose brought me to the delightful Cafe Du Journal. “I love this place” she told me “It’s a real community hub”. A notorious good girl gone wrong, bohemian Rose is naturally attracted to such boltholes. She was found flaunting her gorgeous self at The Hot Spot in Greystones last week, causing her audience to both blush and marvel at her daring darling show.

Rose, of course, was delighted with the reaction. “If we can’t shock, then what can we do?” she asked, wide eyed. Sipping her Americano, Rose filled me in on her upcoming Christmas show in the New Theatre. “The Dazzling Cabaret Revolution!” she beamed “I am fabulously down at heel but still scandalising the masses… And now I’ve got a band and an album on the way too!” She winked boldly.

Rose Lawless, the shabby chic Paris Hilton of Dublin, has come a long way. Underground Rose ran away from boarding school aged sixteen. An anarchist she took a Hungarian lover and found the stage as a burlesque dancer with more than an edge. Her songs celebrate love, sex, sorrow and joy. Only Rose can add such glitter and gore to the kitchen sink drama that is life. A lady and a glamorous tramp!

Looking slinky in an Edith Piaf style black dress, from Lulu French Vintage in Monkstown, Rose glanced out the window and sighed. “Though I am a poor artist, I count that as a blessing” she explained “Toulouse-Lautrec, you know? Beauty comes from poverty”. Indeed, Rose is soon to film a video for her controversial rap song “Up Da Pole” in the city centre. “Like a fash mob, but in our best pyjamas!”

Rose and her comrades will be at the mysterious New Theatre, in the back of Connolly Books in Temple Bar from December 17th to 22nd. With Julie Cruickshank on keyboard, Claire Fitch on cello and Shane Atlas on drums it promises to be a spectacular Rose Lawless cabaret experience. Win a prize for your vintage style and enjoy a dinner deal at nearby La Dolce Vita. Let the fun begin, la vie en Rose!

www.roselawless.com / www.the newtheatre.com / The New Theatre, 43 East Esssex Street, Dublin 2

May 22, 2012

Rose Lawless – La Belle Chanteuse

When I heard that Rose Lawless, the original rich girl gone wrong, was performing at the Centre For Creative Practices I signed up straight away. I last saw the beautiful and the damned good-time girl at the Matchbox Theatre, this time last year, in her fabulous Cabaret Revolution show. Rose has been busy writing (and getting engaged!) so her return to stage was not to be missed.

The Centre For Creative Practices on Pembroke Street proved an intimate venue for her showcase, with comfy beanbags dotted around the room. BYOB was ideal, the place has a handy kitchen with glasses and bottle openers on hand, and I shared a nice vino with my friends. A clever dash en route to Mao on Baggot Street for a tasty curry ensured plenty of soakage for the night.

I had the chance to catch up with Rose beforehand and she was charming as ever, telling me of her delight at finding the perfect vintage wedding dress. And of her latest antics, which she puts so well into song! With that naughty glint in her eye, Rose warmed up the audience with saucy one liners and cheeky asides, singling out some lucky chaps for her special attention!

Serenading us with “Feather Boa” Rose kicked off the show in style, with Julie Cruickshank on keyboard putting melody to her every move. We were treated to a rousing version of “Man with a Moustache”, one of which there was of course for Rose to playfully tease. The show is unique as only Rose can swing from a flirty and filthy ballad to a heartfelt love song, taking us on the crest of her mood as she does.

Rose’s sense of humour is sharp as a knife with “Philosopher Man” and “The Dan Song” speaking to all of us ladies who’ve ever been in love. And of course we have! But brazen Rose Lawless can pontificate the pitfalls of her heart with such… brutal honesty! While still making it sound like great fun. “Dirty Rotten Love Song” encapsulates her ability to grant her lover a double edged tribute.

Enchanted as we were by her hilarious anecdotes, Rose had a surprise up her vintage silk sleeve. A rap song! “Up Da Pole” saw her dropping the trademark husky tone for an earthy Dublin-ese, as she assumed the role of an inner city Virgin Mary. Priceless… Our siren songstress saw us out on a delicate note, poetry and Cohen, befitting the cosy feel of the evening. Le cabaret c’est magnifique.

We drained our glasses and Rose blew a red lipstick kiss goodnight. But the buzz was still alive at CFCP with singer David Noone taking to the keyboard to play a preview of his Nick Cave set, which is happening this Thursday. Retiring to Matt the Thresher, a smart bar across the street, we had one for the road and inspired by the delectable Rose, a good old gab about wonderful terrible love.

www.roselawless.com / www.cfcp.ie / Centre For Creative Practices, 15 Pembroke Street Lwr, Dublin 2